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New Music at WMFO…Post-punk 80s!!! 0

Posted: December 14th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog

Songs from the Squid Pod appears every Tuesday morning from 7-9am. Contact info: @squidpodmusic or squidpodmusic@gmail.com.

80s fans take note:  The Pop Group has reissued their 1980 release, We Are Time, and are planning on a studio reunion release, Citizen Zombie, in early 2015. A compilation of live and unreleased material, We Are Time has been digitally remastered and now available as a CD on the Freaks R Us label.

Originally formed in Bristol in 1977 by Mark Stewart (vocals), John Waddington (guitar), Gareth Sager (guitar), Simon Underwood (bass) and Bruce Smith (drums), their multi-genre influenced style of punk soon had them on the cover NME magazine.  Nick Catsis, who joined later, is also credited on the album.  Before disbanding in 1981 they released three studio albums: 1979’s Y (Radar Records), For How Much Longer Do We Tolerate Mass Murder? (1980, Rough Trade/Y Records), and We Are Time (1980, Rough Trade/Y Records).  Drummer Bruce Smith went on to join New Age Steppers where he met Neneh Cherry who was also with New Age Steppers.  The two married and put together Rig Rig + Panic with the help of Pop Group guitarist Gareth Sager in 1981.  The sound of Gang of Four comes to mind but judge for yourself with “Colour Blind” (link below). Other notable tracks: Track #3, “Genius or Lunatic” recorded live in 1978 in Brussels, and Track #9, “Sense of Purpose.” DJs will want to avoid Track #8, “Springer” for FCC reasons.

The Dingo Babies Serve Up Some “Breakfast” 0

Posted: December 12th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog

The modern music community is obsessed with compartmentalizing artists into specific genres. In a couple of recent album reviews, Pitchfork (the indie blog that has become synonymous with what is new and “interesting”) has given artists labels such as “minimalist no-fi ambient” and “blackened punk”. This feeling of responsibility to neatly sort musicians is a futile one. For example, it doesn’t take long for the differences between punk-pop, pop-rock, power pop, and synth-pop to break down completely. How can you be completely one and not the other?

The Dingo Babies, a five-piece Boston-based band, accept that many people may desire to have a label for the group. but they reject it by what tagline they choose. On their website (thedingobabies.com) they self-identify as “Folk Pop Piano Rock!”, which is about as broad as one can get. Their desire to avoid labels is emblematic of their authenticity and broadness of their influences.

When the band speaks about their music, they identify The Beatles as the common influence between the members. As bassist/vocalist Tommy Ng puts it, “In a small way that’s why we’re THE Dingo Babies and not just Dingo Babies.” But, Ng also identifies Tame Impala, The Avett Brothers, Radiohead (“[Radiohead] embodies a freedom from labels and restrictions”), and Kurt Cobain (“my hero”) as main influences. Keyboardist/vocalist Jim Connolly mentions a couple of non-musicians among his musical influences. “Writers like Shel Silverstein, Tom Waits, and Dr. Suess inspire me by keeping it simple while creating their own little fantasy worlds.” The band members also mention artists from Modest Mouse to Kevin Devine. As The Dingo Babies’ sound is clearly a fusion, Connolly describes it best when he says that the band is “A saucy romance for your ears to hear.”

The Dingo Babies met at an open mic in their dorm basement on their first night of college, and they were inspired by each other. Drummer/vocalist Jamie Rowe said that it all clicked that night. “Basically, we all just were on the same page musically, but in kind of tangential ways.” The result was a band complete with guitars, keyboard, multiple vocalists and a cello.

Their debut album, “Breakfast”, certainly includes all of their stated influences, bringing them together to produce their own sound. Many songs begin with just an acoustic guitar and end with rock-club electric. Throughout the album, the stark contrast between the songs is what grabs you. For example, if you listen to the light and keyboard-heavy “The Color In My Veins” and “The Price of Greed” (which Rowe describes as “A punch in the face”) back-to-back, the difference is stunning. It’s these differences that make “Breakfast” eclectic, interesting, and accessible. It also makes them ultimately lacking a label that adequately sums them up.

In a way, “Wake A Daydream” is representative of the group and album as a whole, a worthy microcosm in only just over two minutes. It features heavy drums, strong cello, a dark keyboard part, and choruses full of harmonies. Rowe agrees with this. “I love how it’s the second track on the album and lets you know not to expect anything.” The vocal harmonies on the refrains are particularly beautiful on almost every track, especially on “Completely Unsure”, “Pain” and “Windows & Mirrors” (the latter of which is lo-fi, feels almost bluegrass-y, and sounds as if it could have been recorded in an empty New England barn. The result is beautiful).

On tracks like the opener, “Completely Unsure”, they call on lyrical themes that are familiar to any music listener: love. “Pain”, a song about getting over a lost love, is the true gem of the album, featuring an irresistible chorus, a catchy opener, and a stellar keyboard solo (and cello solo!). The raw emotion of it is obvious, and Ng confirms it. “We kept most of the first vocal take for that one, because I didn’t have it in me physically or emotionally to do the ending more than once for the record.” “Pain” is also the track that packs the most punch in their live show, with the drums being particularly impactful on the chorus at the end of the track. Rowe says that it’s his favorite song to play live, and Ng says it’s the song that he wants to smash his guitar to during the show.

Some of their lyrics come across as silly and mundane in an entertaining way, songs like “Sometime” (“Make a sound and repeat it/It’s your life get excited/Add it up and divide it back down”), and then take a turn for the metaphorical: “You’re my hero, you’re like me/Waving to yourself in the riptide/I’m standing on the shoreline/Redefining what it means to guard a life.” And, some of the lyrics are just plain silly, like “EZ”: “I should start flossing my teeth/But it makes my gums bleed/I can’t believe people actually do that.”

They wear their political leanings on their sleeve. In “Price of Greed” (a heavy song that is both lyrically and slightly musically reminiscent of Rage Against The Machine), they discuss income disparity and the differences in power that results. In “Burden of Concern” (a soothing complete with reggae bass and top-notch piano), they urge the importance of independent thinking.

These lyrical themes tie in to their values as a group. “Breakfast” is available for free on their Bandcamp. As Rowe puts it, “I didn’t want $5-$10 to be the reason somebody wouldn’t have our music easily accessible to them, that feels lame.” Ng also points out that they have to get their music out somehow, and having it be free is just one way of doing that. “When you’re an independent band with little commercial promotion and you’re not in CD stores, no matter how awesome you are sometimes the opportunity to give your music to someone comes few and far between. I think we really wanted to be able to just give “Breakfast” to someone no strings attached in hopes that they find something in it and want to show it others who may appreciate it too.” This attitude shows their genuine commitment to their music.

The Dingo Babies have also become involved in charities such as Calling All Crows, The Ally Coalition and The Berklee Movement recently. Ng describes the rationale behind it. “Having our music serve something bigger than our egos is incredibly good for the soul, and if that’s in good shape then the music flows better in my mind.. it creates a positive feedback loop. I hope everything we do artistically can encompass that somehow.”

What’s next for The Dingo Babies? They’ve been playing shows in the Boston area recently, trying out some new material that didn’t make it to “Breakfast”. They say that Facebook is the best way to keep in touch for show updates and releases. But Connolly points out the ultimate goal for the band’s direction: “Forward. I’d like to continue.”

Keep Safe Boston on Wednesday 0

Posted: December 8th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog

Twenty years ago this month, 2 women were shot and killed in 2 separate Brookline reproductive healthcare buildings, 5 others were wounded. In response to this, Massachusetts passed a law to create buffer zones around clinics that provide abortions, and metal detectors were installed, all in an attempt to keep employees and clients safe. In the summer of 2014, the buffer zone law was struck down by the US Supreme court, and Governor Patrick enacted a new law to ensure safety for those entering reproductive health facilities. As a result of this and the continuous stream of news stories that involve violence against women, Keep Safe Boston was born.

The Boston music community has a long history of pulling together to put on shows and raise money to help causes – from individuals who need financial support to larger organizations that serve the greater Boston community. If there’s a need, Boston bands show up, and show up big. Twenty years ago, a compilation called Safe & Sound: A Benefit in Response to the Brookline Clinic Violence was released to raise funds for organizations that help women in who need it. This inspired Anngelle Wood put out the call to artists to contribute songs to be included on a pay-what-you-can digital compilation when Keep Safe Boston was formed, the songs poured in. Download the 50-song Keep Safe Boston compilation here. It’s a pretty amazing collection of current Boston bands, and as a collection is a beautiful mix.

Wednesday night’s show at Brighton Music Hall will feature hip hop artist Jass Bianchi (above), Boston Music Award nominees Parlor Bells, 2014 Rock and Roll Rumblers The Color and Sound, pop songwriter Corin Ashley, lo-fi grunge rockers Drab, and alt-americana rockers The Rationals. There will be vendors at the show, and raffles for really cool stuff – like tickets to sold out shows – with all proceeds to benefit Planned Parenthood. Wednesday is also Human Rights Day, and was purposefully selected as the date for the performance.

This benefit show and compilation is part of something much bigger. “Keep Safe Boston is a movement to ensure we raise our voices to create a safer, more compassionate community. It is about violence against women, the growing rape culture, human rights issues, domestic violence, dating violence, bullying and more,” says Wood. The KSB team is working with other human rights-type organizations like Amnesty International and local colleges and their safety programs.

Another organizer and WMFO’s On the Town with Mikey Dee DJ Pam van der Feest explains the ‘keeping your friends safe’ ethos that is so familiar to those who are clearing out of a rock club at 2AM:
“At the end of the night, we make sure our friends can get home safe. Do they have a ride? Do they need to be walked to their car? Keep Safe Boston is about instilling this same attitude into the young people in our city. How do we as a city look out for each other?”

As 2014 comes to a close, Keep Safe Boston has its eye on 2015. “KSB will continue to build its voice and presence in the community. My goal is to support like-minded organizations, team with college campuses, local politicians, and directly involve the music and arts community in this mission,” says Wood.

The Keep Safe Boston benefit for Planned Parenthood is on Weds, Dec 10, 2014 at Brighton Music Hall

KeepSafeBoston.org Facebook.com/KeepSafeBoston, and @keepsafeboston on Twitter.

The Graveyard Shift presents Monday Massachusetts Metal News 0

Posted: December 8th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog

The Graveyard Shift airs at 4 a.m. on Saturdays and showcases metal bands from Massachusetts; from nu metal to black metal with no discrimination. You can contact the show with submissions, requests, questions, or for any other reason at graveyardshiftma@gmail.com, facebook.com/graveyardshiftradio, or @graveyrdshiftma on Twitter. This weekly column will keep you posted on the latest news related to local metal bands and shows. For more updates, visit the show’s website at graveyardshiftma.wordpress.com.

News

* Want to go to the stacked Despised Icon reunion show at The Palladium for free? Dysentary is running a contest for a free ticket plus some merch. To enter, you’ll need some social media skills to share the show flier and tag the band. Click here for complete details.

* Within the Ruins vocalist Tim Goergen is offering online vocal lessons via Skype. Click here for more information including the contact email.

* Horrible Earth is floating the idea of a metal and grind festival next summer and are looking for your input on who you’d want to see. Get in on the Facebook discussion here.

* Vivisepulture announced that guitarist Rachel Knight has departed the band, but fill-in drummer Colin Frecknall has joined full time.

* Empty Lighthouse posted an interview with The Summoned in which the band talks about their upcoming album Sessions, time signatures, and the Boston metal scene.

* I know we’ve probably dwelled on them too much in this column, but what do you expect when Unearth put out one of the best albums of the year? First, check out another Australian interview (the band is in high demand Down Under) with guitarist Buz McGrath from Mixdown Monthly. Then watch guitarist Ken Susi discuss his affinity for the LTD Signature Series KS-7 guitar below:

* Killswitch Engage vocalist Jesse Leach sat down for an interview with Hatebreed front man Jamey Jasta to discuss a variety of topics ranging from New England hardcore to the “economics of touring.” Check it out below:

* FINISHER announced the end of their hiatus and have made it known to bookers, promoters, and other bands that they are looking to tour in 2015.

* Cortez is in Q Division studios for their next album and have promised a “super-secret cover song.”

* Show announcements!

- Razormaze announced their annual “Hometown Holidaze Rager” at Great Scott on December 23. They’ll be joined by Ramming Speed, Abstruktor, and Meth Valley.

- Grue unveiled their first two shows of the new year: January 16 at O’Brien’s Pub and February 7 at Ralph’s.

- Overcast announced a series of four shows that will most certainly sell out, so get on it if you want to attend. They are: January 29 at the Middle East, January 30 at The Ruins (Providence), and January 31 and February 1 at Ralph’s.

- Buried Electric was added to the Stick to Your Guns “Disobedient Tour” show at The Palladium on February 21

- Forevers’ Fallen Grace will open for Saxon on May 9 at The Palladium.

New Music

In case you missed the show last Saturday, we played two new tracks. First is Halfhearted Comeback’s new single from their upcoming album Bricklayer. You can check out the very NSFW “Talk Sh*t” on Reverb Nation. Next is Levity’s “Come Out and Play,” for which you’ll also need to hop over to Reverb Nation to hear.

Next, we have two new releases to tell you about. Although we already posted the track “Spiraling” off of Parasitic Extirpation’s Putrid Crown, the album has finally been released. Pick up your copy here. Flying more under the radar, Forevers’ Fallen Grace posted a digital copy of the new Ascending the Monolith for purchase on their website. The physical release will be sometime in January 2015.

Concert Calendar

Wednesday, December 10

The Sinclair: Russian Circles and Mutoid Man

House of Blues: HIM, Motionless in White, and Wounds

Thursday, December 11

Paradise Rock Club: The Ghost Inside and Every Time I Die with Hundredth, Architects, and Backtrack

Ralph’s Rock Diner: Her Majesty, Cruel Miracle, Transdusk, and Back to School (Deftones cover band)

The Red Room @ Cafe 939: Chirality (farewell show) with Seven Spires and Slumberjack

Friday, December 12

Middle East: Morne, Churchburn, Obsidian Tongue, and Sea

Dublin’s: Sciomancy, Forevers’ Fallen Grace, Shibboleth, and High N Heavy

Saturday, December 13

The Raven: “Winter Wars for Josh” with My Brother’s Fault, Wolfman Chuck, All for Blood, Mass Punishment, Levity, 6 Foot Silence, From Ashes Reborn, Fates Last Fight, and The Excrementals

Sammy’s Patio: XXX-XMAS Toys for Tots Fundraiser: Distressor, Don’t Cross the Streams, Fate Worse Than Death, My Missing Half, and Carved in Stone

The Palladium: We Came as Romans, Chiodos, Sleepwave, and Slaves

13th Floor Music Lounge: Thunderforge, Unconscious Disturbance, Slumberjack, SNAKE MUTHAFUCKA

Sunday, December 14

The Wilbur Theatre: Sully Erna

House of Blues: Attila, Crown the Empire, Like Moths to Flames, and Sworn In

 The Graveyard Shift’s playlist for December 6, 2014

1. Cave In – Inspire (Antenna)

2. Halfhearted Comeback – Talk Shit (Bricklayer)

3. Levity – Come Out and Play

4. Doomriders – Heavy Lies the Crown (Darkness Come Alive)

5. **Stoner Hit of the Night** Summoner – Horns of War (Atlantian)

6. Til Our Collapse – Creature (Structures\\Remolded)

7. Necronomichrist – The Swarm (Apparitions of the Obscene)

8. Mutoid Man – Gnarcissist (Helium Head)

9. Horrible Earth – World Wide Famine (Horrible Earth)

10. Transdusk – Gaia Spectre (single edit)

11. Obsidian Tongue – Hyper Dimensional Blood Lotus (Volume I: Subradiant Architecture)

12. Morne – My Return (Asylum)

 

Winter Deserves A Playlist 0

Posted: December 5th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog

No matter who you are, once Thanksgiving is done and we’ve left all of the leftover stuffing in our fridges to rot, everyone is bombarded with Christmas marketing immediately. Black Friday is just the beginning. I’ve found, above all, that Christmas music in particular is incredibly pervasive (invasive?) and gets stuck in your head and rattles around in there for the whole season.

I’m not a Scrooge about the Christmas season, but I am definitely secular, so Christmas music isn’t really my thing. I get in the spirit, sure, but it isn’t exactly my meat and potatoes, if you will. I prefer my music to be more winter-themed, or at least for it to sound like winter and feel like either warmth or cold, depending on the mood.

So, here’s a playlist of some of my favorite songs that I like to trot out for the winter months, as it is December already, after all. If you like my choices, maybe you’ll even check out my radio show for WMFO (it’s called “Cloudberry Farm”). Here’s the playlist, with some explanations as to why they’re on my winter list.

1. And It Spread by The Avett Brothers: I could have put any song from The Avett Brothers’ album “I And Love And You” on this playlist. It’s the ideal winter list, with top-to-bottom beauty, and I just like this one in particular.
2. Agape by Bear’s Den: A sad song about a lost love. But those HARMONIES on the chorus!! So sad and beautiful. Just like winter.
3. Accidentally In Love by Counting Crows: Let’s be honest, this song can go on any season list. I’m basically adding it here because a lot of this list is gonna be on the sadder side, so it needs some balance with what is basically the happiest song every written.
4. The Journey by Tom Misch: Let this instrumental track put you to sleep during the winter months. Ideal.
5. Mother Maple by Chadwick Stokes: Ah, it’s high time that we listened to a track that is solely about appreciating maple trees. It’s also probably a metaphor, but I haven’t read into it that much. No matter what it is, it’s a beautiful song that is going to be the soundtrack to my winter, and hopefully yours.
6. Calon Lan by London Welsh Male Voice Choir: Okay, okay. My floormates make fun of me a lot for constantly blasting traditional Welsh hymns. But guys, they’re so beautiful. Something about them just really gets to me. They have such power with such minimalism. The choral aspect really hits it home, too. This is one of my particular favorites (and look up the lyrics! Ahhh!). It just screams winter beauty. I’m also not close to Welsh.
7. Small Bump by Ed Sheeran: I am an unashamed Ed Sheeran fanatic. The minimalism and beauty of this song is perfect for winter. It’s even a very nice song lyrically until Ed decides to absolutely ruin that by making it unbearably sad in the final verse. Feel free to skip that part if you don’t want your day ruined by a song that you thought was only nice. It’s still beautiful.
8. Blood Bank by Bon Iver: Any Bon Iver track would work here. This one gets to me. Lovers meet unpredictably, etc, etc. It fits any mood, as it sounds sad, but is actually happy . . . this song is actually the source of a lot of identity crisis for me.
9. Winter Winds by Mumford and Sons: The quintessential winter song, as the title hints at. Also, the fact that a lot of these songs are by brits is kind of convincing me that I might belong across the pond?
10. Sometimes by My Bloody Valentine: I love this song, even though it is definitely quite weird and is very hit-or-miss. If you hate it, that’s totally fine. But give it a try.
11. Keepsake by State Radio: Another one of those songs where you can’t quite place the mood, but the beauty is unmistakable. That seems to be the lay of the land when it comes to winter music.
12. Trouble Weighs a Ton by Dan Auerbach: Minimalist and nice. Ahhh, winter.
13. Somebody To Love by Queen: Something about the choral music just gets me during the colder months. Plus, it’s Queen. Can you lose?
14. 20 Years by The Civil Wars: Oh, choral parts and harmonies. I can just see the snowflakes falling outside my window.
15. Come On Up To The House by Tom Waits: Acoustic folk masterpieces? Yes, please.
16. Love Song #2 by The White Buffalo: Crippling sadness and an acoustic guitar. You can just taste the winter in the air.
17. Snow and Lights by Explosions In The Sky: One of my favorite bands of all time, I really just picked this song because “snow” is in the title. Any of their songs could be selected.

Happy listening! I hope you like my selections. Looking back over them, I found that I like to be ambiguously sad and slightly british during the winter. I like the acoustic music for its minimalism: it mirrors a new layer of snow falling outside without a sound–a blank slate without any errant sounds. Have fun with the secular Christmas music!

The Graveyard Shift presents Monday Massachusetts Metal News 0

Posted: December 1st, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog | Tags: , ,

The Graveyard Shift airs at 4 a.m. on Saturdays and showcases metal bands from Massachusetts; from nu metal to black metal with no discrimination. You can contact the show with submissions, requests, questions, or for any other reason at graveyardshiftma@gmail.com, facebook.com/graveyardshiftradio, or @graveyrdshiftma on Twitter. This weekly column will keep you posted on the latest news related to local metal bands and shows. For more updates, visit the show’s website at graveyardshiftma.wordpress.com.

News

* Dates for the 2015 New England Metal and Hardcore Festival have been announced! The show will take place at the Worcester Palladium April 17-19. Stay tuned for band announcements starting next week…

* Bands continue to get into holiday merch mode. The Acacia Strain and Ice Nine Kills have released new stuff including Christmas sweaters.

* The Thanksgiving Eve show featuring Jasta at the Waterfront Tavern was postponed due to snow and has been rescheduled for Saturday, December 20.

* Converge and Rob Zombie were highlighted on Metal Injection’s list of vegan and vegetarian bands that “skip the turkey on Thanksgiving.”

* The Middle East’s building has been officially purchased by venue owners Joseph and Nabil Sater. This should end fears that the club would need to shut down.

* Travel Amygdala posted the latest episode of “Travel Amygdala Presents TV,” which features The Walking Pen and The Beer Olympics. You can check out Episode 3: Potsy Invasion here.

* Ride with the Devil posted a review of last year’s The Fateful Hour release, An Everlasting Silence.

* Unearth continues the press rounds, this time in Australia. First Loud interviewed guitarist Buz McGrath, and vocalist Trevor Phipps sat down with The Underground Australia to discuss Watchers of Rule.

New Music

A little light on brand new releases this week, so we have one rough cut for you, plus some music we missed from November.

* The Summoned have been working on their 2015 album Sessions, and they just released an orchestra version of the song “Fractal Patterns.” They are promising to incorporate orchestral elements throughout the album, and you can check out the rough, unmastered track below:

* Full Body Shot released Second Impact back on November 4, which you can check out on their Bandcamp page.

* In Depths & Tides now have a lyric video for their song “Parasitic Rebirth” from [Bio]Luminescence, which they released earlier this year. You can check it out on YouTube.

Concert Calendar

Monday, December 1

O’Brien’s Pub: Joe Stump, The Ethan Brosh Band, Burning Heat, and Riff Legion

Friday, December 5

The Worthen: Bleak, Conforza, Rum Ham, George Orwell the Musical

Ralph’s Rock Diner: Epicenter, The River Neva, Burns from Within, and Tunderforge

Palladium: Devin Townsend Project, Animals as Leaders, and Monuments

Saturday, December 6

Sammy’s Patio: “A Night to Dismember:” with Nocuous, Vivisepulture, Ashen Wings, Begat the Nephilim, and Horrible Earth

Lucky Dog Music Hall: The Looks That Kill Calendar Release Party with End Time Illusion, Til Our Collapse, Voices of the Dead, and Carved in Stone

Ralph’s Rock Diner: “Unite the Clans III” with Necronomichrist, Barishi, LORE, Barren Oak, Sonic Pulse, and The Jovian Moons

Palladium: Nonpoint, Hed PE, Recoil, Devlyn Sydus, In the Red, and Fear the Masses

Sunday, December 7

Maximum Capacity (Chicopee): “Toys for Tots Toy Gathering Tour: Round 3” with To Die a Legend, The Aberration, Other Peoples Demise, Pruf, Colossal Groove, The Shape, Halfhearted Comeback, No Window, and Creature Machine

O’Brien’s Pub: Bastard Noise, Nyodene D, Ultra//Negative, Xiphoid Dementia, Hospital Bomber, Eaten

The Sinclair: Doomriders 10th Anniversary Show with Elder and Summoner

Tsongas Center: “Prepare For Hell Tour” with Slipknot, Korn, and King 810

The Graveyard Shift’s playlist for November 29, 2014

1. Converge – Dark Horse (Axe to Fall)

2. Lich King – Toxic Zombie Onslaught (Toxic Zombie Onslaught)

3. Lich King – Toxic Zombie Onslaught (Do-Over EP)

4. Grzelakurse – For No Reason

5. **Stoner Hit of the Night** The Proselyte – End Regions (Our Vessel’s in Need)

6. Iron Gag – Mouthbreather (EP 2014)

7. Carnivora – Human Decimator (Eternal)

8. Sorrows of Saviors – Memorial (Perennial)

9. The River Neva – Night of the Long Knives (Chemistry Of Holocaust)

10. From the Makers Of – Kiyoshi’s Song (Whatever, Humanity (Split with Bottomfed))

11. Ice Nine Kills – The Greatest Story Ever Told (Safe Is Just a Shadow)

12. Burns from Within – Incident (A.D. EP)

The Graveyard Shift presents Monday Massachusetts Metal News 0

Posted: November 24th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog | Tags: , , ,

The Graveyard Shift airs at 4 a.m. on Saturdays and showcases metal bands from Massachusetts; from nu metal to black metal with no discrimination. You can contact the show with submissions, requests, questions, or for any other reason at graveyardshiftma@gmail.com, facebook.com/graveyardshiftradio, or @graveyrdshiftma on Twitter. This weekly column will keep you posted on the latest news related to local metal bands and shows. For more updates, visit the show’s website at graveyardshiftma.wordpress.com.

News

RPM Fest 2015 was announced and will take place September 4-6, 2015. The festival features many metal acts from the area, and the organizers are currently polling fans on who they want to see. Get on it!

* Sorrowseed wants YOUR input on where they should play next year and who they should tour with.

* Just in time for the holidays, everyone is stocking up with new available merch. Check out new stuff and special sales from Rozamov, My Missing Half, and Defeater. You can also grab Atlantian from Summoner at a 20% discount in celebration of the LP’s one-year anniversary. But act quick—the sale ends Wednesday!

* Unearth has been everywhere recently, gracing the cover of Fuze Magazine and being interviewed by both Metal as F*** and Exclaim! TV in Canada.

* In other press, Lesley University has a brief piece on Jacob Bannon from Converge, and David Davidson of Revocation penned a piece for Invisible Oranges on his passion for jazz. My Missing Half was also interviewed over on Dead Rhetoric.

* Overcast, the local metalcore godfathers that spawned Shadows fall and Killswtich Engage, announced that their full, remastered discography will be released on February 3, 2015. It will include 45 tracks over 3 CDs, and the band will again reunite to tour in support of its release.

* It’s not his entire catalogue, but Rob Zombie will be releasing four of his albums on limited edition vinyl on December 12. Get you pre-orders in now.

* Doom quintet Fórn received the second (and possibly final) pressing of their The Departure of Consciousness LP, which you can purchase at the band’s store.

* All That Remains announced that their forthcoming album will be called The Order of Things and will be released on February 24, 2015. Meanwhile, the always outspoken Phil Labonte Tweeted that Taylor Swift’s songwriting is superior than that of most metal bands, and everyone freaked out.

* Two more compilations were released that include local metal. Endless Bummer Records put out Star Spangled Bummer: Friends and Family Sampler 2014, which features “Gardener” by Bottomfed. In addition, All Metal Music Promotions put together their World of Metal Vol.2 compilation, which includes “He Was My Son and Today Was His Birthday” by Halfhearted Comeback.

* Centerlink announced that they will again be raising money for the Greater Boston Food Bank as part of a food drive sponsored by WAAF. All sales of their music via Bandcamp and iTunes between now and the drive will be donated to the Food Bank. The band will also have two more shows where fans can donate: December 6 at Victory Lane in Millis and December 12 at JR’s Bourbon Street Rock House in Cranston, RI.

* In lineup news, Iron Gag announced Steven Ramos as their replacement on guitar for Cory Spratt, who left the band earlier in the year. Meanwhile The River Neva replaced the departing Chris Abbott with Mat Woodard on guitar.

* Acaro, which announced an indefinite hiatus in July, announced one final show at Great Scott on January 2, 2015. They’ll be joined by Sexcrement, Untombed, and Hope Before the Fall.

* V. announced their CD release show to be held the following night at Ralph’s Rock Diner. They’ll also be shooting footage for a music video there.

* Godsmack’s 1000hp came in at number 19 on Revolver’s list of the Top 20 Albums from 2014. The list is something else.

New Music

* Missed this a couple weeks ago, but “DOOMJAZZ” band The Modern Voice released their self-titled album on November 8. You can stream and pick it up on their Bandcamp page (name your price).

* Two free tracks were posted online this week. First up is “Negative” by Methuen metalcore band Distinctions, which you can download off Bandcamp. Next is “Endless War” from Buried Electric. The single is a preview of their upcoming Heretic Download it from (where else?) their Bandcamp page.

* The first track released by Lich King off their Do-Over EP is “Toxic Zombie Onslaught,” which you can view below. You can compare it to the original version for a taste of what the newly recorded tracks will sound like on the EP, which will be released on Lichmas Day (December 25).

* And last week’s full release is an EP from Red Equals Meltdown, which is titled Beyond Saving. The album is available on iTunes and Bandcamp, and they also posted every track on YouTube. Check out the title track below:

Concert Calendar

Monday, November 24

Opus Underground (Salem): Heavy Necker, Two Chord Terror, Iron Gag, and Brother Clayton

Wednesday, November 26

3065 Live (East Wareham): Second Annual Hometown Throwdown with Drained, Seven Day Curse, On Your Deathbed, One Ton Tommy Gun, Bottomfed, Deficiency, Full Body Shot, and Clouded

Waterfront Tavern (Official Customer Appreciation Party): Jasta, Dead by Wednesday, Disguise the Curse, Cyperna, To Die a Legend, Dystrot, Cities in Ruin

Palladium: The Word Alive with The Color Morale, Our Last Night, The Dead Rabbits, Myka Relocate, Following Horizons, The Oath Between Us, Comeback Of The Year, The Last King, Limitless, Make the Rules, Buried Electric

Friday, November 28

Dublin’s Sports Bar & Grill (New Bedford): Leukorrhea, Necris, Smite the Righteous, and Lower the Casket

O’Brien’s Pub: Discordia with Bog of the Infidel, Sangus, Human Bodies

Palladium: Slayer, Suicidal Tendencies, Exodus

Saturday, November 29

3065 Live: From The Makers Of, Sunday Liar, Thee Midnight Society, Low Expectations, Sorrows of Saviors, The Worst Of Us, and A Cry On Deaf Ears

Waterfront Tavern: Grzelakurse, Clover, Krakatoa, Iron Gag, and Titans

Sammy’s Patio: Carnivora with Apollo’s Resurrection, All for Blood, Begat the Nephilim, Overwith, and Before the Judge

Middle East: Thanx-Killing Fest Part 1: Ice Nine Kills with The Venetia Fair, Chasing Safety, We The Machine Set Sail at Sunrise, Sorror of Saviors, In Honor Of, and Letting Go

Brighton Music Hall: Death with Obituary, Massacre, and Rivers of Nihil

Palladium: Halestorm with New Medicine, and The Dead Deads

Sunday, November 30

Brighton Music Hall: Corrections House with Sexcrement, Statiqbloom, and The Proselyte

Paradise Rock Club: Living Colour with Unlocking the Truth

House of Blues: Skinny Puppy, Front Line Assembly, Haujobb, and Youth Code

The Graveyard Shift’s playlist for November 22, 2014

1. 6L6 – Yeah Right (Superstar)

2. Red Equals Meltdown – React (Beyond Saving EP)

3. Buried Electric – Endless War (Heretic EP)

4. Distinctions – Negative

5. The Modern Voice – Crows (The Modern Voice)

6. **Stoner Hit of the Night** Problem with Dragons – Wanting (Atomics)

7. Ramming Speed – Anthems of Despair (Summer Jam) (Doomed To Destroy, Destined To Die)

8. PanzerBastard – Centurion (Centurion EP)

9. My Missing Half – Empty Dreams (The Lives I’ve Ruined)

10. George Orwell the Musical – Rebirth (The Hegelian Dialectic)

11. To Die a Legend – Two Mirrors (Knife Paradigm)

12. Crowfeeder – Pinebox (Pinebox / Unholy Black Wings / Wish)

 

Awake: The Life of Yogananda 0

Posted: November 24th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog

Although he was not the first to bring yoga and Eastern spiritualism to the US, Paramahansa Yogananda’s extended 30-year residency in America significantly impacted its proliferation. His popularity was due in part to his dedication to living and working in America, which he believed was his calling, but extended to his relatable and scientifically-grounded teachings.

Yogananda’s first lecture in the US was delivered in Boson and titled The Science of Yoga. He spoke of restructuring the brain through the repetition of meditation, creating grooves he likened to those on a phonograph record. This analogy is now understood to be an early understanding of neuroplasticity, something that wouldn’t be studied for decades. Although Yogananda’s concepts may have been advanced, relating them to elements in the physical world as well as aligning them with science brought the mystical experience down to an approachable level.

Yogananda was a man of his times, describing everyday life as vivid cinematic experiences that could be fantastic while not authentic. The filmmakers of Awake: The Life of Yogananda run with this idea as seen through documentary footage, with the grainy quality to be expected from early film, spliced with surrealistic reenactments and manipulation of still images focusing on Yogananda’s arresting gaze.  The film attempts to create a historically accurate portrait of Yogananda and a record of his teachings in the United States while only hinting at reported scandals and accusations among his contemporary yogis. Focusing on the facts of his teachings and the beliefs of his followers without questioning their validity at times creates the feeling that one is watching a late-night infomercial. Still, the testimonials are from people such as George Harrison, Deepak Chopra and 30+ year practicing followers like Sister Premamayee. The facts of Yogananda’s life, as related by believers, make a strong case for a life of isolated meditation as the true path to self-realization.

The documentary montages of Yogananda’s Vedic teachings practiced in modern settings across the globe are entirely images of quiet, solemn meditation; that is, except for the images of a large group of spandex-clad women doing yoga in Times Square. While Yoganananda used popular culture to his advantage, the latter in turn may have adopted some of the more superficial aspects of the former’s teachings. The possibility that an individual would internalize the spiritual benefits over time seems to be an example of both his patience and confidence in his message. A particularly telling interaction is related by actor and jazz singer Herb Jeffries. Rather than forbidding Jefrries’ behaviors of drinking and womanizing in order to practice meditation, Yogananda slyly says he can’t promise that, through meditation, those behaviors won’t become less appealing. The filmmakers, with their ever-present, hypnotizing Eastern music and compelling imagery, similarly challenge you not to consider yoga and meditation as a serious lifestyle change.

Awake had a limited local run, but you can request a screening through Gathr.

BUST Holiday Craftacular: This Saturday 0

Posted: November 20th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog

This Saturday, November 21st, BUST magazine is hosting their first annual Holiday Craftacular in Boston, at the Boston Center for the Arts. I had the pleasure of talking to one of the women who has been working to bring the Craftacular to Boston.

This event has existed in New York City for 9 years, and will return to Brooklyn again this year. However, this is the first time that the Craftacular has come to bean town. More than 100 vendors will gather to sell their products, which makes it a one-stop holiday shopping experience. It is not just a NYC event dropped into a new city–it will be thoroughly Boston! The vendors will be Bostonians and New Englanders, selling products that are unique to this area. The women at BUST wanted to expand the event into our area because it’s such an accessible city, and because so many of them have personal connections here. It’s been in the works for years, and this year their dream is finally becoming a reality!

Two exciting and new events are coming to the Craftacular this year:

The first is the Cat Café, which is exactly as awesome as it sounds. BUST partnered with Broken Tail rescue, an organization that works with rescue animals throughout Massachusetts and New England. You can visit the café to get something warm, have a seat, and most importantly, cuddle with some adorable rescue cats.

There will also be an Ugly Sweater Selfie Booth with some incredible Christmas and Hanukkah sweaters.

The Craftacular is not just a fun place to get holiday shopping done, it is also a great way to support an independent publication like BUST. Melissa described it as a “light in the dark” and a “home space in the media” for women who are looking for something fresh to read about.

Saturday! 11am-6pm! Cyclorama at the Boston Center for the Arts!
Be there!

For more information visit:

http://bust.com/craftacular/bust-craftacular-home.html

Fitz & The Tantrums at House of Blues Boston 0

Posted: November 20th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Blog

Michael Fitzpatrick, frontman for Fitz & The Tantrums, describes his band’s music as “soul-influenced indie pop”. Some listeners may hear motown, and some may hear straight-up alternative rock. For a band that has, since their start in 2008, opened for acts from pop-rock heroes Maroon 5 to soul-popstar Bruno Mars to ska legends The Specials, this is a narrow designation. If I had to explain their music, I’d say that it sounds like James Brown with modern pop sensibilities, but even that wouldn’t fully do it. After seeing them live at the House of Blues in Boston on November 16th, I won’t be trying to explain their music to anyone anymore. I’ll only tell them to go see the damn show.

The show started with the opener, Big Data, coming onstage to play for the largely under-30 sold-out crowd. They began by playing an automated voice, announcing itself as the NSA, telling us to post everything that we see tonight to our social media accounts. The motif of governmental monitoring (implicit in their name) carried on throughout their half-hour set, including them playing a cover of Hall & Oates’ classic “Private Eyes” (which left most of the crowd confused, as it was before their time). Many people knew their hit single “Dangerous”, which they closed with before Fitz & The Tantrums took the stage.

They swaggered onstage and got everyone clapping immediately as they took their instruments, lights flashing amongst a background of a flashing heart, as is shown on their most recent album, More Than Just A Dream. The beats were loud and the energy was unmatched. The stage presence of Fitzpatrick perfectly complemented the charisma of singer Noelle Scaggs, who snapped and smiled her way around the stage in between her verses.

The set included almost the entirety of More Than Just A Dream, with a few cuts from Pickin’ Up The Pieces, their first album, which were not received quite as well (with the notable exceptions of “Don’t Gotta Work It Out” and “MoneyGrabber”). The choruses were the big selling points for the crowd, as everyone bounced and sang along no matter if they knew the verses or not. The energy from the band (who finished the night covered in sweat) was palpable and contagious; they didn’t need to encourage anyone from the crowd of 2,300 to dance or sing along to their music.

Their cover of Eurythmic’s classic “Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)” was a pleasant surprise and went along with their sound quite nicely, as they added their own kick to it. A bigger surprise came during saxophonist James King’s solo in the middle of “L.O.V.”, when he played the riff to Jason Derulo’s current hit “Talk Dirty To Me”, which sent the crowd into hysterics (whether it was excitement or laughter, I’m not sure). “Fool’s Gold”, one of the singles from More Than Just A Dream was the best-received track before the encore; the hook is irresistible and even more so live.

The encore began with their biggest hit to date, “MoneyGrabber”. They jammed on the song, getting the crowd into it, for much longer than it usually clocks in, and finished it with confetti cannons pumping confetti into the crowd, giving a smaller venue the feel of an arena show. The show ended with “The Walker”, which sent everyone home happy. None were spared of an excellent night, and it was clear that Fitz & The Tantrums are one of the hardest-working bands on the scene right now. It’s no surprise that their popularity has skyrocketed.

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